Christian Politics 4

We get things done smoothly at our jobs by cooperation, coordination, communication, and teamwork.  People working together find a common ground approach to achieving efficiency, economy, and quality outcomes.

When this is not the case…when the system is not working…when time and money are factors…then changes are made to the system and/or to the people in leadership.

A variety of viewpoints and polarization of starting opinions may be helpful in some businesses where creativity and problem-solving is inherent in the work description…but some synthesis as a working methodology that focuses towards an end-point goal…is the model for most enterprises.

The reality of human nature is that we are not cookie-cutter, think-alike replications.  This is an observed reality that argues for intelligent design in the deepest and most profound way.  A God who could only create robotic duplicates patterned after the same model…would not demonstrate much creative imagination or technical expertise.

The Bible tells us that we are created in the image of God…and the creative innovation of human imagination parallels the nearly infinite combinations of traits found in the varieties of appearances and thought processes of people.

This blog is called Christian Politics…and it must recognize God as the Creator of this world and the people who inhabit it.  It therefore must be taken as a given that differences of opinion will be part of even the best this-worldly political and cultural system.

That being said…what can we glean from the Bible?

The first thing that should hit us square in the face…is that in the cross and the resurrection of Jesus…both the very worst and the very best are interwoven within the same series of events.  The rejection and crucifixion of Jesus does not happen as a separate, side-event within history.  The Jews were celebrating Passover throughout the nation of Israel…and while they were in exile, since their deliverance from Egypt.

How can Christian politics be viewed in a world where Jesus Christ is raised from the dead…despite the incredibly evil and misguided efforts of the contemporary ruling elites in Jerusalem at that time…religious imposters posing as God’s agents…and the deadliest of enemies of the early Christian church?  How does politics fit-in within this extremely adversarial environment?

The simple answer…and an answer that may be totally unsatisfactory because of its simplicity and lack of detailed direction or agenda applicable to our modern issues…the simple answer is to exercise faith in God and follow His leading…no matter what is the composition of the ruling government.

This is the approach of the early Christian church and its first evangelists who took the gospel message bravely out into the Greco-Roman empire…starting first at the most adversarial location in the heart of the city of Jerusalem…the great spiritual city where the King of Glory was crucified and rose from the dead…changing the world forever.

To Be Continued.

Author: Barton Jahn

I work in building construction as a field superintendent and project manager. I have four books published by McGraw-Hill on housing construction (1995-98) under Bart Jahn, and have six Christian books self-published through Create Space KDP. I have a bachelor of science degree in construction management from California State University Long Beach. I grew up in Southern California, was an avid surfer, and am fortunate enough to have always lived within one mile of the ocean. I discovered writing at the age of 30, and it is now one of my favorite activities. I am currently working on two more books on building construction.

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